Monthly Archives: June 2014

People living in Islington, London, are living traumatised lives, like frightened door mice, behind closed doors.

People living in Islington, London, are living traumatised lives, like frightened door mice, behind closed doors. Diana  is  a  lone  parent  of  two  children:  her  son  is  now  an  adult  whilst  her  daughter  is  still  at  primary  school.  She lived  in  Islington  since  she  was  ten  years  old.  She  has  never  worked  and her  son  […]

Tunnel 228: The Old Vic Tunnels

Tunnel 228 was an exhibition set into a warehouse by Waterloo train station. The warehouse is dark as the night with only the occasional lighting effect to illuminate the darkness. Participants are told to wear face masks at all times – I guess because the air is dusty. You walk around and there is a […]

London was but is no longer the biggest city in the world

London has been big, the biggest city in the British Isles for a long time. In the nineteenth century, following the industrial revolution, it experienced unparalleled growth as the capital of a new British Empire fuelled by steam power and gunpowder. Subsequently by the middle of the nineteenth century London, with two million people, it […]

Inner and Outer Boroughs of London

For some London is a bounded entity surrounded by the Green Belt of which we know consists of thirty-two London boroughs and the City of London. These thirty-two Boroughs comprise the official version of London, and include the City of London, Inner London and Outer London. The three entities comprise Greater London. Orin Hargraves in […]

John Northouck identified that 18th Century London consisted of two cities, one borough and forty-six ancient village

The decentralized aspect of London owes to the fact that London’s many centres were once, as Style City points out, autonomous villages, which over the years grew outwards and conjoined to form the sprawling mass that is, that is you know what. This point has long been recognized by scholars. Said John Northouck, in 1773, […]